Cultural Representation to Representation of Culture

I immediately think of he dances in WoW. each race has a dance that is a reference to a cultural artifact. Because of the game's popularity, the dances have become cultural representations of the game itself.

The first video shows the source material for each race's dance.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=066_q4DIeqk

The second video shows the first part of the Blizzcon 2009 dance competition.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sccRmIzrCVA

Life on the Rez: Problematizing Culture With Salen and Zimmerman

Before I begin, I'm going to briefly recap my final project from 605 (Computers and Writing) that I took last spring. I explored the representations of Native Americans in video games and the problematic nature of representing Native Americans without relying on stereotypes that are rooted in some of the very first images of Native Americans (or American Indians). I liked this project a lot and realized that anytime a culture is represented through a medium such as video games, a lot more is at stake than just faulty representations.

Civic engagement: The Game

Choose a video game that has a large number of online players to interact with, either an MMO, Xbox live game, Facebook game, etc. that you have no experience with.
As a new member of this community, explore the different ways that established members work with and against each other in the game. Your goal is to become an active member of that community.

Civic Games PSA

See attached file.

Civic Engagement / RPG Syllabus Approach

Jess, Katie, and Don's Group

1. Defining the world: describe the world, give students an idea of how each group interacts with one another, incorporates research based on technology—corresponding time period with Earth. Plagiarism (defining what you’re allowed to define and what is already defined about this world). Literature: Tolkein; origin stories (Native Americans); ethnography of a group you want to model your world on).

Civic Participation and Video Games

I found this week's reading to be very interesting, though a bit lacking in some areas, in the way that a lot of quantitative work tends to be if it follows the rules. I think that the work does highlight some very important features of games that often go overlooked: their relationship to real society, history, and culture. Video games can not only teach us about learning (Gee), but also teach us, period.

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