Almost forgot...

I mentioned last week at the end of class that I didn't like Williams' book. Let me rephrase that–it's more of a style issue that I have. The personal insertion of the author is something I've long detested, and this goes way beyond my discomfort with personal narratives. This is a matter of "how much is too much"–where does it end? Can I talk about my bowel movements and how they were related to my writing process in my thesis? How about the time I threw up when I was 4 upon eating spaghetti for the first time? These are extreme examples, I know, but they get to the heart of this kind of autobiographical insertion–we don't need to know how much you've had to drink, or what you're drinking.

That being said, I do find it very interesting where Williams talks about her students' resistance to the complexities of law. I think as educators (in my case "budding" educator) we run into similar issues with our students when we begin discussing "controversial" issues–politics, religion, sexuality, and...wait for it...RACE! As I've said many times before, I generally don't like engaging in those discussions (or in classes specifically focused on these topics) because the temptation to devolve into a communal feeling of "yes I'm Other, and I have problems. You have to solve this, whiteness!" But I think Williams' point, a point that I'm finding more and more comforting, is that these issues are interrelated. Race plays a huge factor in who gets equality, rights, and fairness.